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by Wendi Elizabeth Martha Scarth

 

Triptych Framing
Photoshop Elements

 

This is a Photoshop Elements Tutorial - Click Here!

Three Panelled Triptych Framing
 Suitable for Adobe Photoshop Elements Editor
Skill Level - Intermediate Plus

Wendi E M Scarth

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This tutorial demonstrates how to create a three panelled Triptych Picture Frame from a
photograph. To work along, you are welcome to download the Start Images I am working with
Here. Unzip the file and open the image onto Photoshop Elements’ workspace.

Understand Layers

Triptych - pronounced trip-tick
The word Triptych originates from the Greek language - Tri meaning three. It refers to three-panelled artistic productions that were popular during the middle ages; during this era, Christian Art was popular, and many churches today, display relics demonstrating triptych panelling in the form of wood carvings, paintings and stained glass windows. 

Note
If you are printing your work, choose a photograph with a
High Resolution.

Undo Note
You can step backwards at any time by clicking the top menu’s Undo Tool.



1/
Open your Start Image onto Elements’ workspace; File then Open: Ctrl/Cmd then O.

Tip
Centralise your photograph by snapping it to the top menu’s orange horizontal line.





Elements 11, 12, 13, 14 & 15 - Tool Options Palette positioned at the bottom of the workspace. Although the palettes have been redesigned the tools work in more or less the same way.

2/
Then from the Tools Toolbar, activate the Rectangular Marquee Tool.



And enter the following attributes into the Tool Options Bar.



Now, left-click and drag out a Rectangular Selection Marquee over the photograph’s
left-side - as illustrated below.





Notes
If you are creating a three panelled (vertical) triptych frame, as demonstrated in this tutorial, you will be utilising the same Rectangular Selection Marquee for all three panels; therefore, ensure it is the correct size for your needs before commencing. To Resize the Rectangular Selection Marquee after its application: - from the top menu, choose Select then choose Transform Selection -  Then resize the Selection Marquee by tugging one of the Transformation Bounding Box’s Repositioning Handles.



After you have applied your first Rectangular Selection Marquee, you are ready for the next step.

3/
From the top menu, choose Select then choose Save Selection. From the subsequent Save Selection dialogue box, enter a name for your Selection, then click OK.



4/ First Panel
Now, press Ctrl then tap the J Key. (Layer then New then Layer via Copy). This copies the area inside the Rectangular Selection Marquee, and pastes it as a New Layer in the Layers Palette - as illustrated below. (You will no longer see the Selection Marquee).



5/
To retrieve the Selection Marquee: from the top menu, choose Select then choose Load Selection. From the subsequent Load Selection dialogue box, (selecting the Selection Marquee you saved earlier): accept the default settings, then click OK.





6/
Now, activate the Background Layer.

And gently nudge the Rectangular Selection Marquee to the right: - so it incorporates the photograph’s central area, by repeatedly tapping your Keyboard’s
Right-facing Arrow Key.





Proceed To The Next Chapter: Chapter 7.

Smaller Triptych Panels - Notes
If you would like one large, and two smaller panels, (instead of three large vertical panels); if necessary, press Ctrl then D to remove the Rectangular Selection Marquee. Then drag out a (smaller) Square Selection Marquee over the photograph’s right-side; then continue with the next Chapter - Chapter 7.
        


7/ Second Panel
Now, press Ctrl then tap the J Key. (Layer then New then Layer via Copy. This copies the area inside the second Rectangular Selection Marquee (or smaller Square Selection Marquee), and pastes it as a New Layer in the Layers Palette. Then again, activate the Background Layer - as illustrated below.

not missding bottom


8/
Now, from the top menu, choose Select then choose Load Selection. Then, from the subsequent Load Selection dialogue box, accept the default settings - and click OK.



9/ Third Panel
Activate the Rectangular Marquee Tool, (and with the Arrow Keys), tap the Rectangular Selection Marquee over to the far-right area, as illustrated below. 



10/
Then from the Layers Palette, activate the Background Layer.



11/
Then press Ctrl then tap the J Key. This copies the area inside the Rectangular Marquee, and pastes it as a New Layer in the Layers Palette.



Now you have created your three Panel-Layers, you are ready for the next step.

12/
From the Layers Palette: hide the visibility of the Background Layer by left-clicking to remove the Layer’s Eye Icon - as illustrated below.
 


Tip
If necessary, centralise each panel by activating the Move Tool .

And gently tap each panel into position.



13/
Unlock the Background Layer by double-left-clicking over it, and clicking OK to the subsequent New Layer dialogue box.



Tip
Now is a good time to
save your Layered Image as a PSD File.

14/
From the Toolbar, activate The Crop Tool



Now, detach the image from the orange horizontal line by dragging it away from it. Then, working on the Background Layer; surround your image with a Crop Bounding Box, then enlarge the canvas by dragging out the Crop Bounding Box. (Remember to click the Commit tick, afterwards, or tap your Enter/Return Key).

Important Note
Ensure the extended bounding box is symmetrical.

Note
You may need to reduce your canvas size using the Zoom Tool .



After you have created a Transparent Border, you are ready for the next step.

15/
From the Tools Toolbar, activate the Move Tool .



Now, left-click over each panel, and drag them (one-by-one) to their final positions - (I have created a six-square transparent border). Remember to tap each panel into position (pixel-by-pixel) using the Keyboard’s Arrow Keys.



Tip
Use the Transparent Chessboard Background as a guide: - alternatively, activate the Rulers - Shift+Ctrl+R.

16/
To apply Drop Shadows to each panel; activate each panel individually: - then from the top menu, choose Layer then choose Layer Style then choose Style Settings then choose Drop Shadow.  After you have applied identical Drop Shadows to each Panel-Layer, you are ready for the next step.
     


Tip
Save your image with its Layers intact, (
as a .PSD file) to edit at a later date. 

17/
When you are happy with the panels’ positions: - from the top menu, choose Layer then choose Merge Visible.

Tip
If you prefer, Delete the Layer 1 (the Bottom Layer) by right-clicking it, and choose Delete Layer from the subsequent drop-down list.



18/
Then from the top menu, choose Layer then choose New Fill Layer.  Now, Fill the New Layer with your choice of either Solid Colour, Pattern or Gradient: then drag the Fill Layer below the Triptych’s Layer - as illustrated below.



Borders Tip
To apply a thin border around each panel: activate each panel consecutively: - and from the top menu, choose Layer then choose Layer Style then choose Style Setting then choose Stroke. Enter your choice of Colour and Size into the subsequent Layer Style’s dialogue box, then click OK.





Tip
Save your image with its Layers intact, (
as a .PSD file) to edit at a later date. 

19/
To finish, from the top menu, choose Layer then choose Flatten Image.
 


20/
Congratulations, you have completed your Triptych Conversion;
and it is ready to save or print.

Tip
If your Triptych’s border is un symmetrical, Crop it to size.

Have fun creating Triptych panelling from your own images - images without focal points work best; for example, landscapes.


Wendi E M Scarth. 
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